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Ivana Trump’s tragic fall is a reminder to use a safety checklist for our seniors at home

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Prior to her death last week at age 73 after a fall in her New York City townhouseIvana Trump’s friends were worried about her navigating her twisting staircase, according to reports.

Ivana Trump died last Thursday from blunt force injuries to the torso after a fall, the New York City Office of the Chief Medical Examiner said last Friday.

She was found unconscious and “in close proximity” to the bottom of a staircase in her apartment.

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On Wednesday, July 20, Ivana Trump’s funeral service will be held at St. Vincent Ferrer Catholic Church in New York City.

Fox News Digital reached out to several of Ivana Trump’s friends for comment after her tragic death.

Ivana Trump poses with her children (from left) Eric, Ivanka and Donald Jr.

Ivana Trump poses with her children (from left) Eric, Ivanka and Donald Jr.
(Courtesy of Eric Trump)

Many families worry about the safety and well-being of their own beloved parents and grandparents, especially those who remain in their homes by themselves.

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Family members and friends want to help their older loved ones safely navigate their way throughout their homes as they age.

Smart steps for all families to take

There are smart steps all families can take to ensure the safety of seniors inside the home — steps that will positively impact the safety of the whole family, too.

“Falls are very common, especially as we begin to age,” Stacie Detmer, a family nurse practitioner in St. Louis, Missouri, told Fox News Digital in an email.

Exercise is so important for people to do, especially as they grow older.

Exercise is so important for people to do, especially as they grow older.
(iStock)

Detmer explained that all of us “experience many changes in our bodies, including vision loss and loss of muscle strength and tone.”

Simple ways to prevent falls are “maintaining good lighting throughout the home and eliminate area rugs or items on the floor,” she also said.

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Installing handrails on stairs and in bathrooms, wearing non-skid or supportive footwear, and “performing a regular exercise routine, which includes balance exercises” are also helpful, she said.

Another expert on aging noted that care should be taken with older friends’ and relatives’ feelings as people work to make their homes safer for all.

“There’s no shame in the fact that many seniors need assistance around stairs, and they shouldn’t be made to feel fragile or incapable.”

The normal changes aging brings can be “embarrassing and scary,” Sara Robertson, CEO of Arbors Assisted Living, which has throughout locations in Massachusetts, told Fox News Digital in an email.

“There’s no shame in the fact that many seniors need assistance around stairs, and they shouldn’t be made to feel fragile or incapable,” said Robertson.

A granddad is shown enjoying every second with a cherished grandchild.  It's wise to design a home with

A granddad is shown enjoying every second with a cherished grandchild. It’s wise to design a home with “LOVE,” explained a senior living design expert — adding that optimizes this stands for “light, visual and ease.”

She advised that when making safety changes to the home and explaining those changes to the older family member, simply say “that you want to make things as easy as possible for this senior citizen, so that they can live more comfortably.”

Robertson also recommended “an easy emergency alert system that they [the seniors] can have on their body at all times.”

She added, “You can find them as a necklace, bracelet or clip-on. If they do have an issue, they can press it and it will send them help.”

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When senior living design expert Lisa Cini of Columbus, Ohio, was designing her home for her multigenerational family, which included her 92-year-old grandmother’s apartment, she came upon a method that she shared in her book, “Hive: The Simple Guide to Multigenerational Living.”

“If you design with ‘LOVE,’ you increase independence and dignity.”

“When it came time for me to sit down and design Grandma’s apartment, I hit on an easy-to-remember design philosophy, which is remarkably similar to a life philosophy: LOVE,” she told Fox News Digital on Tuesday.

This stands for “Light, Optimize, Visual and Ease,” she explained. “If you design with ‘LOVE,’ you increase independence and dignity.”

Seniors may be unsteady on their feet and need proper footwear, appropriate lighting and careful furniture placement.

Seniors may be unsteady on their feet and need proper footwear, appropriate lighting and careful furniture placement.
(iStock)

L stands for “light”: Have as much natural light as possible, use sensor lights to help illuminate the way in the dark and make sure the space is bright enough for senior eyes, said Cini.

“Ideally, lighting in closets, hallways and under the bed should be on motion sensors,” she said.

To make the stairs more visible, use a different paint color on the top and bottom steps, she advised.

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O stands for “optimize.” A great example of this, said Cini, is installing handrails or grab bars by the toilet and by shower controls, to help with stability.

V is for “visualize”: Use contrasting colors to make the handrails easy to see, said Cini.

Also, “consider installing a camera in the home so loved ones can check on seniors to make sure they are OK when alone for extended periods.”

Older people can be unsteady on their feet and suffer aches and pains — so it's important to follow simple yet effective safety measures that enhance life and keep loved ones safe.

Older people can be unsteady on their feet and suffer aches and pains — so it’s important to follow simple yet effective safety measures that enhance life and keep loved ones safe.
(iStock)

E is for “ease”: Create “open furniture layouts that create wandering paths versus dead-end corridors,” said Cini.

“Choose furniture wisely and avoid glass tables, because it’s harder to see the edges. Cover pointy corners with clear silicone rubber.”

More tips for seniors, especially for those who live alone

Cini offered additional tips for our seniors at home.

Here is some of her smart advice.

1. Avoid wearing slippers or flip-flops at home. A foot can roll — or the flip-flop can bend under at the toe, causing a fall.

2. Ensure that after you get up from a chair or bed or out of the bathroom, you steady yourself and let your blood pressure regulate before attempting the stairs.

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3. Ensure your depth perception is correct — bifocals can often make this difficult.

4. Keep up your exercise. It is said that younger people who are more active don’t fall less — they recover from falling better. Also, they don’t fall all the way to the ground.

5. Remove all clutter from the steps, including items like magazines and shoes. ivana

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Also, if you have “drop foot” (a condition that causes difficulty in lifting the foot), be extra careful on the stairs.

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